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Dr. Malobi Mukherjee

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Dr. Malobi Mukherjee

Lecturer, Business


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Manchester Business School, University of Manchester
    2001 – 2006;
  • Master of Business Administration (MBA), University of Leeds 2000-2001;
  • Bachelor of Arts (Sociology), Presidency University, Calcutta, India

Biography

Malobi relocated to Singapore from the UK in 2013 where she joined the Nanyang Technological University as a Research Fellow and eventually moved to James Cook University in February 2019 to take up her current role as Lecturer in Business. She also holds an International Visiting Research Position at the Oxford Institute of Retail Management in University of Oxford’s Said Business School where she also worked as a Research Fellow. During her doctoral programme at the University of Manchester she was recipient of the AXA PPP Healthcare scholarship.

Her research interests focus around strategic reframing, international retail development in emerging markets, and bottom of pyramid consumer issues. She is also a futurist who uses the scenario planning methodology to assess the impact of disruptions and uncertainties on strategic decision making. She has adopted the scenario planning methodology to research the future of retail development in emerging markets like India, the future of retail real estate in China, the future of mobility in the Asia Pacific region, the future of convenience stores in the UK and the future of omni channel retailing in Singapore. She has been quoted in the Straits Times and Business Times about the role that innovative retail formats could play in rejuvenating the retail industry in Singapore. She has experience in working with retailers such as John Lewis, Sainsbury’s and global companies such as AMDOCS in her capacity as a researcher and consultant.

Research Interests

  • Scenario planning
  • Strategic Reframing
  • Retail development in emerging markets
  • Bottom of pyramid consumer behaviour